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Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Outsourcing and Sending Jobs Offshore...What If You Were CEO?



As the topic heats up in the Presidential race over outsourcing and sending manufacturing jobs offshore, Crain's Chicago Business profiles a company called Littlefuse on how it saved itself, became profitable and is looking to acquire more companies...because of outsourcing and sending manufacturing jobs offshore.

What would you do if you were the CEO of the company?

Would you do the same?  How would you do things differently?

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

I'd do like Weather Tech, who has built new facilities in Illinois, and is INSOURCING the jobs, then make that a big part of my marketing strategy. Quality products made in America by American workers on American equipment. They got my business. Buy USA seems like a good slogan to me. I'd much rather support American workers, and companies whose CEO cares enough about America to INSOURCE. I don't trust someone who sends their jobs overseas and hides their money in foreign banks.

Anonymous said...

Unfortunately labor intensiv.e jobs will always go where labor is cheapest. Buy Americn is a great slogan, but only promotes the production of inferior products at a higher cost to the consumer

Anonymous said...

So you're saying that Weather Tech's products are inferior? I suspect you don't know, and really are a business person trying to justify your own outsourcing. You don't believe in Buy American because you don't believe in America.

Anonymous said...

No, I am saying if Weather Tech, or any manufacturer could count on sales simply by being an "American Company" they have no incentive to maintain quality standards.
This philosophy espoused by the United Auto Workers in the 70's was the beginning of the end for the American auto industry.

Anonymous said...

You are right that quality standards need to be maintained, but you seem to be saying that's not possible from American workers. It's not an all-or-none proposition. American workers are at least as capable, if not more so, of producing quality products. Your reference to the end of the American auto industry (which hasn't ended, BTW) is a great example. The American auto industry has expanded because foreign companies such as Toyota, etc. have opened factories here w/ American workers. I guess you'd say that's okay because from their perspective they're outsourcing.

Anonymous said...

Actually, I just remembered one of the biggest "Made in the USA" campaigns ever. It was the early years of Walmart. Then they started buying everything from China, etc. That change had NOTHING to do w/ quality. The quality of their merchandise dropped dramatically. It had everything to do w/ being cheap. In fact, they figure they'll make more money from low quality merchandise because they assume we're all idiots and will keep coming back to buy the same thing that just broke or wore out way before it should have. Unfortunately in too many cases they're right.

Anonymous said...

A nations work force is neither good nor bad. It is the individual only who can be measured in those terms. Quality standards are set by the "manufacturer" A conscienous decision was made by the American auto companies in the 70's to rely on their being an American company rather than investing resources in innovation and product quality, and as a result were unabe to compete with the manufacturers of foreign goods.
Toyota is, or was last i heard, a Japanese auto company. I am not quite sure how their operating facilities in the United States has expanded the American auto industry.
American auto manufactures no longer employ the number of people they once did, they no longer have the market share they once enjoyed, and have infact have only remained viable thru the increasing outsourcing of jobs to less expensive labor markets.

Anonymous said...

There seems to be some assumption made in USA good, made somewhere else bad. Less expensive and cheap are not necessarily interchangeable

Anonymous said...

While Made in USA does not automatically mean a better product, my experience is that more often than not the USA product is of a higher quality. And less likely to include poisonous ingredients.